Rebecca Jung, RN, BSN was attending Texas Tech University with a major in Geology when she decided that nursing was her calling. She was managing a veterinary clinic at the time, and had fallen in love with the science and healing. Shortly thereafter, she moved home to north Texas and attended nursing school at Weatherford College.

After graduating with honors, Rebecca took her Associate of Applied Science in Nursing to Long Term Acute Care. Working with the critically ill patients of this population taught her not only the basics of nursing, but how compassion and strength are needed as well. Rebecca moved to Houston, Texas and received a job in the Texas Medical Center.

Still working in Long Term Acute Care, she specialized in Transplant nursing – heart and lung transplants mostly – and expanded her nursing experience exponentially. Utilizing her now expanded knowledge base, Rebecca applied for and received a promotion into Transplant Case Management.

During this time, she also attended school at University of Texas at Arlington and completed her Bachelors of Science in Nursing. Having completed research courses as part of the curriculum, Rebecca fell in love with Research Nursing. She was recommended for the position of Program Coordinator for a research program her hospital was launching as a sub-cohort of a grant from CMS. Rebecca soon found herself managing a major research grant with a focus on Sepsis early detection and intervention. She initiated and created training for employees and physicians, and assisted with the development of a Sepsis protocol for her hospital system.

Being on the forefront of the new Sepsis awareness in healthcare, Rebecca has helped develop simulation scenarios for sepsis education, refined research protocols to better patient outcomes, as well as formulate a data analysis of lives saved through the program, as well as cost savings from early intervention of sepsis. Rebecca feels that in the time she has spent on the Sepsis grant, she has helped save more lives than she ever could as a bedside nurse. She is currently in the process of expanding the Sepsis program to the rest of her hospital system’s campuses in the Houston area. Looking forward to Graduate School, Rebecca hopes to receive her MS in Nursing Education and eventually teach nursing someday.

 

                                  


 

NAA Today Blog

Editor

Janet Henriksen
President/Founder/CEO Nurse Advocacy Association

Website hosting provider Squarespace has shut down the website of the group America’s Frontline Doctors following a press conference they held in Washington D.C., according to Dr. Simone Gold. According to a screenshot posted by Gold, the web hosting service shut down the group’s website for “activity that’s false, fraudulent, inaccurate or deceiving.”

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The video of the physicians speaking in Washington DC needs to be heard.  Censoring medical experts for political reasons is insanity and puts the health of the public at great risk.  Physicians Need to be Heard

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Lisa Brosseau, ScD, is a nationally recognized expert on infectious diseases. Brousseau taught for many years at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She may be retired from the university, but she’s not retired from teaching. She recently cowrote an opinion piecethat drew a lot of notice: In it Brousseau argues that cloth masks offer no protection from COVID-19. As one might imagine, it drew a lot of attention and caused a fair amount of controversy. She recently sat down with Infection Control Today®to talk about her strong feelings about cloth masks and that data she used to reach her conclusions.

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  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) acknowledged Thursday that it is combining the results from viral and antibody COVID-19 tests when reporting the country's testing totals, despite marked differences between the tests. First reported by NPR's WLRN station in Miaimi, the practice has drawn ire from U.S. health experts who  say combining the tests inhibits the agency's ability to discern the country's actual testing capacity. “You’ve got to be kidding me,” Ashish Jha, director of the Harvard Global Health Institute, told The Atlantic. “How could the CDC make that mistake? This is a mess.”Viral tests — commonly referred to as PCR tests as most of them use a process known as polymerase chain reaction — are used by health professionals to determine whether or not a person is currently infected with the disease. During the pandemic, viral tests have been the most effective way of being able to diagnose a positive case of COVID-19. They are what state governments have been counting to track the number of confirmed cases of the virus they have.Antibody, or serology, tests serve a different purpose. Unlike viral tests that are taken by nose swab or saliva sample, antibody tests examine a person's blood to see if their immune system has created antibodies to combat COVID-19. These tests allow doctors to see if someone has previously been exposed to the virus. As the push for widespread testing in the U.S. has strengthened, antibody tests have been widely produced, many experts have balked at saying that antibodies equate to immunity from COVID-19. Serology tests are also less accurate than PCR tests, increasing the chances for a false negative.    Continue Reading
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